Featured Work

The following are some of my published works as a writer and journalist.

 Published in the Georgia Straight, 2016

Published in the Georgia Straight, 2016

From a hang-up to a cultural phenomenon: Jim Wong-Chu on Asian Canadian literature

Step into your local bookstore and you can find the names of Asian-Canadian writers shelved beside their literary peers.

Writers such as Bharati Mukherjee (now American), Terry Woo, Wayson Choy, Larissa Lai, Madeleine Thien, Rohinton Mistry, and Anita Rau Badami can be found alongside the likes of Joseph Boyden, Alice Munro, and Margaret Atwood. More than 20 years ago, Asian-Canadian literature wasn’t as prominent as it is today. In reality, it was still in its infancy: born out of growing frustration and the need for expression.

 Published in the Calgary Herald, 2016

Published in the Calgary Herald, 2016

Feeling like 'others,' Asian-Canadians struggle to find identity

 

“Open your eyes,” a man told John Iglesias, then a teenager just hanging out around a 7-11 in Sarnia, Ont. with his best friend. The man, with his buddies, repeated: “Open your f—ing eyes — why can’t you open your eyes?”

The harassment continued by the white men who then pounced on Iglesias and his friend, Colin Marcoux, who was also white yet guilty by association. Iglesias, now 37, remembers being curled up on the ground, laughing in shock as he tried to protect his head while being beaten.

 Published in Noisey (Vice), 2015

Published in Noisey (Vice), 2015

Life as a First Nations Person in Calgary's Hardcore Scene

The 2015 Mrs. Universe pageant was more than just show, with Ashley Callingbull Burnham, of the Enoch Cree Nation in Alberta, being the first First Nations woman to win Mrs. Universe. And though numerous problems still continue to plague First Nations people, Callingbull’s success is indicative of the recent progress made in regards to First Nations relations: by winning the pageant, she’s brought to light various social and cultural issues about being a First Nations person, especially as a woman growing up on a reservation.

 Published in the Arts Commons Winter 2017 issue

Published in the Arts Commons Winter 2017 issue

Dirtsong: a Conversation with Fred Leone of Black Arm Band

In Brisbane, Fred Leone is driving as we converse over the phone. Though it’s nearing the afternoon, Leone sounds exhausted, having slept little the night earlier as he had premiered his own production that he had written, directed and produced all by himself.

“I just feel so—there’s a weight off my shoulder. I feel fulfilled,” Leone sighs, relieved. The respite is brief, however, as he is lined up to showcase his production the following week in Tramway, Glasgow.